New Parkinson’s Disease Treatments 2021


Article last updated on 4/1/2021

What is Parkinson’s disease?


Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a progressive brain disorder that causes shaking and muscle stiffness, and slows movement. It develops when neurons (brain cells) in a particular part of the brain stop working properly and are lost over time. These neurons produce an important chemical called dopamine. Dopamine is used by the brain to send messages across brain areas to help control movement. Eventually, the brain cannot make enough dopamine to control the movement properly.1, 2


Is there a cure for Parkinson's disease?


There is currently no cure for Parkinson’s disease. Existing treatments aim to help patients manage symptoms.


What are the latest approved treatments for Parkinson’s disease?


Several medicines have been approved for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. Here are some of the available medicines for Parkinson’s disease:


Nuplazid (pimavanserin)3, 4

Nuplazid (pimavanserin) is the first medicine approved for the treatment of hallucinations and delusions associated with Parkinson’s disease psychosis.

Nuplazid (pimavanserin) was approved for the treatment of patients with hallucinations and delusions associated with Parkinson’s disease psychosis by the Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) (USA) on April 29, 2016. On December 3, 2020 The (FDA) approved an update to the prescribing information for Nuplazid (pimavanserin) that will allow the medication to be taken more easily by Parkinson’s patients who have difficulty swallowing.


Ongentys (opicapone)5, 6

Ongentys (opicapone) is a medication used for the treatment of Parkinson disease. It is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with Parkinson disease. It is used as an add-on to levodopa/DOPA decarboxylase inhibitors (DDCI) (other medicines for Parkinson’s disease) in patients who are having fluctuations in the control of their condition.

Opicapone was approved for treating patients with Parkinson’s Disease as an add-on to levodopa/DOPA decarboxylase inhibitors (DDCI) in patients who are having fluctuations in the control of their condition by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) on June 24, 2016 and by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on April 24, 2020.


Nourianz/Nouriast (istradefylline)7,8,9

Nourianz/Nouriast (istradefylline) is a medication used for the treatment of "off” episodes in patients with Parkinson’s disease. The “off” episodes in Parkinson’s disease lead to an increase in Parkinson’s disease symptoms, such as tremor and difficulty walking, and it results from low levels of dopamine between doses of carbidopa/levodopa, and they can be unpredictable and appear more frequently over time.

Nourianz/Nouriast (istradefylline) was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), USA, on August 27, 2019 and by the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA), Japan, in June 2013.


Inbrija (levodopa) 10,11,12

Inbrija (levodopa) is an aromatic amino acid indicated for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. It used to treat symptoms during ‘off’ periods (times when the patient has more difficulty moving about) that occur while the patient is taking their usual treatment of a combination of carbidopa and levodopa. It does not replace regular carbidopa/levodopa therapy.

Inbrija (levodopa) was approved for the intermittent treatment of OFF episodes in patients with Parkinson’s disease treated with regular carbidopa/levodopa medicine by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), USA, on December 21, 2018 and the European Medicines Agency (EMA), Europe, on September 19, 2019.

If you’ve received a Parkinson’s disease diagnosis and are trying to access a new medication for Parkinson’s disease that is approved outside of your country of residence, we might be able to help you access it with the help of your treating doctor. You can read more about the medicines we can help you access and their price below:




What are existing experimental treatments for Parkinson's disease?


There are currently several treatments under clinical trials for the treatment of motor and non-motor symptoms as well as treatments aimed to prevent, slow or halt the overall progression of Parkinson's disease.

For a complete list of experimental treatments for Parkinson’s disease, visit the Michael J Fox organisation website here.


Why buy a Parkinson’s disease treatment with TheSocialMedwork?


TheSocialMedwork is registered in The Hague with the Dutch Ministry of Health (registration number 6730 BEM) as an independent medicines intermediary. We have helped patients from over 85 countries to access thousands of medicines including. With a prescription from your treating doctor, you can count on our expert team to safely and legally guide you to access a new drug for Parkinson’s disease. If you or someone you know are looking to access a medicine that is not yet approved where they live, we can support you. Contact us for more information.


References:

  1. Ema.europa.eu
  2. Parkinsons.org.uk
  3. Wayback.archive-it.org
  4. Parkinsonsnewstoday.com
  5. Ema.europa.eu
  6. Drugs.com
  7. Accessdata.fda.gov
  8. Fda.gov
  9. Pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov
  10. Accessdata.fda.gov
  11. Parkinsonsnewstoday.com
  12. Parkinsonsnewstoday.com

  13. Disclaimer: This article is not meant to influence or impact the care provided by your treating physician. Please do not make changes to your treatment without first consulting your healthcare provider. This article is not intended to diagnose or treat illness or to influence treatment options. TheSocialMedwork is as diligent as possible in compiling and updating the information on this page. However, TheSocialMedwork does not guarantee the correctness and completeness of the information provided on this page.