Huntington's Disease

About Huntington's disease

Huntington’s disease is an inherited progressive brain disorder that results in the deaths of neurons. It usually appears in a person's thirties or forties and it is characterised by uncontrolled movements, emotional problems, and loss of cognitive ability. Individuals with the adult-onset form of Huntington disease usually live about 15 to 20 years after the onset signs and symptoms, whilst people affected by the less common juvenile form which begins in childhood or adolescence usually live 10 to 15 years after symptoms appear1.

The prevalence of Huntington’s disease varies greatly between different geographical regions, which can partly be attributed to differences in case-ascertainment and/or diagnostic criteria, however there is consistent evidence of a lower incidence in Asian populations. There is also evidence its prevalence has increased in Australia, North America and in Western Europe over the past 50 or so years2

References 

1. Huntington disease
    Genetics Home Reference, cited on Feb 2018.

2. The Prevalence of Huntington’s Disease
    Rawlins et al., Neuro-epidemiology, Jan 2016.

  1. Austedo (deutetrabenazine)
    Austedo (deutetrabenazine)
    by Teva Pharmaceuticals
    for Huntington's Disease, Tardive Dyskenia
    €4,485.00
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